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How to Snatch an Expiring Domain – Brad Frost | Andrew Allemann | Mike Davidson

Following a thread that starts here: BradFrost.com

Capture failed.
“It couldn’t be!” I thought to myself, as I opened a new tab and visited bradfrost.com. My stomach sank as I saw a domain parking landing page stuffed with ads…

That Andrew Allemann on DomainNameWire.com picked up. How Most People See Domain Investors

Revisited by Brad Frost
How Most People See Domain Investors

Who reminds us of a couple of great posts on how ‘the Drop’ works.

After 40 days are up, the domain’s status changes to “redemption period”. During this phase, all WhoIs information begins disappearing, and more importantly, it now costs the owner an additional fee to re-activate and re-register the domain. The fee is currently around $100, depending on your registrar. When a domain enters its redemption period, it’s a good bet the owner has decided not to renew.
Finally, after the redemption period, the domain’s status will change to “locked” as it enters the deletion phase. The deletion phase is 5 days long, and on the last day between 11am and 2pm Pacific time, the name will officially drop from the ICANN database and will be available for registration by anybody.
The entire process ends exactly 75 days after the listed expiration date. For an even more detailed explanation, read the article Inside a Drop Catcher’s War Room.

via Mike Davidson – How to Snatch an Expiring Domain.

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